To the snake by denise leverto

If so, what then would the term "Green Snake" portray? She married American writer, Mitchell Goodman, and this caused her to relocate to the United States inwhere she and her husband lived in New York. Might this be a poem about the seductive power and danger of gambling?

Early on, critics and colleagues alike detected an American idiom and style in her work, noting the influences of writers like William Carlos WilliamsH.

On the one hand, there is the "voice of education" which teaches that the snake is bad. She would have a son through this marriage. It could also be seen as a term of endearment, indicating a liking for the snake - as opposed to speaking merely the word "Snake".

Most people would conclude that it is meant to portray the hissing sound that the snake makes. This wake takes ages to disappear and can usually be seen stretching even as far as the horizon. To what then would "the whispering silver of your dryness sounded close at my ears" alude?

Read the left column and then answer the following questions: In the opinion of Hayden Carruthwriting in Hudson Review, To Stay Alive "contains, what so annoys the critics, highly lyric passages next to passages of prose—letters and documents. Could the poet be signifying that?

At the age of five, she was already saying that she would be a writer when she grew up. Like many thinking Americans, Levertov became politically motivated during the Vietnam War, joining in the protests against American involvement.

Although she later divorced, she nevertheless became a naturalized citizen and her poetry has been described as being "thoroughly American". It nevertheless gave her great pleasure to have bonded so with the snake.

For example, Moses's staff was decorated with a serpent as representing God, and as long as Moses held the serpent aloft, God was on his side. THE SOUND OF MONEY "Green Snake, when I hung you round my neck and stroked your cold, pulsing throat as you hissed to me, glinting arrowy gold scales, and I felt the weight of you on my shoulders, and the whispering silver of your dryness sounded close at my ears" An argument has been put forward that this poem is more about money, greed and gambling than about a snake.

How then should one interpret this poem? These writings reveal the pressures of one who felt herself to be "the other", being part of but nevertheless excluded from most identities: She worked for much of the last part of her life in American universities and published over twenty collections of poetry, translations and criticism before her death in Apart from her protest poetry, she also wrote many poems with religious themes, ranging from religious imagery to implied metaphors of religion.

These writings reveal the pressures of one who felt herself to be "the other", being part of but nevertheless excluded from most identities: This germ of personal mythology burgeons in Here and Now with a fable-like aura added to it.

When Levertov had her first poem published in Poetry Quarterly inRexroth professed: Have you looked at the questions in the right column? It is the intense aliveness of an alert domestic love—the wedding of form and content. Unlike her early formalized verse, Levertov now gave homage to the projectivist verse of the Black Mountain era, whereby the poet "projects" through content rather than through strict meter or form.

How then should one interpret this poem? After all, what the serpent was offering was wisdom, the same thing that all schools and universities offer. Her "voice of consciousness", on the other hand, persuades her that she would like to become bonded for just a short time with one of the "lords of life", and that such a bonding would give her much pleasure.

As a university academic, would not the poet agree that wisdom was indeed very desirable? On the other, there is the "voice of conscience" which says that what the snake offers is good. It also signifies a lack of emotion and feeling. The prose is utterly free of restraints, save those demanded by a fierce, independent spirit insisting at all times on honesty.

That's a great deal of sibilance, don't you think? Although a few poems in this collection focus on the war, there is no direct evidence of the immediate events of the time. THE SOUND OF MONEY "Green Snake, when I hung you round my neck and stroked your cold, pulsing throat as you hissed to me, glinting arrowy gold scales, and I felt the weight of you on my shoulders, and the whispering silver of your dryness sounded close at my ears" An argument has been put forward that this poem is more about money, greed and gambling than about a snake.

READ THIS At a first glance, the poet has draped a green snake around her neck and stroked it, listening to its hissing scales as it moved slowly around her ears. Reproduced by permission of Pollinger Limited and New Directions.

Mary Kaiser, writing in World Literature Today, said of the collection:To The Snake By Denise Leverto Essays: OverTo The Snake By Denise Leverto Essays, To The Snake By Denise Leverto Term Papers, To The Snake By Denise Leverto Research Paper, Book Reports.

To The Snake by Denise Levertov: poem analysis

ESSAYS, term and research papers available for UNLIMITED access. In the poem 'To the Snake'; the author Denise Levertov use several writing techniques to portray money and gambling.

She uses syntax, sound imagery, color imagery, figurative language, and symbolism to represent money and gambling. Symbolism is used cleverly throughout the poem to depict a number of things that would take numerous readings. In the poem “To the Snake” the author Denise Levertov use several writing techniques to portray money and gambling.

She uses syntax, sound imagery, color imagery, figurative language, and symbolism to represent money and gambling. Transcript of To the Green Snake. S I F T Consider the line length. What do you notice? How does a snake move? Denise Levertov To the snake repetition of green - innocence, money, gambling, jealousy, Garden of Eden stroked?

intimacy cold - dead pulsating - alive paradox. Or perhaps the snake represents temptation, just as the First Woman in Eden was tempted by the serpent. ABOUT THE POET Denise Levertov is regarded as an internationally respected American poet. The snake, of course, is strongly associated with the temptation in the Garden of Eden.

To The Snake

About Denise Levertov Denise Levertov was born and educated at home in England.

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To the snake by denise leverto
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